All Care Guides

Pyoderma

Pyoderma is a bacterial infection of the skin. It can occur when the skin’s natural defenses break down, allowing common skin bacteria to multiply out of control (called overgrowth). Bacteria from another source may also take hold when given the opportunity. Other organisms, such as yeast and fungal organisms, can take advantage of the skin changes that occur with pyoderma and establish their own infections. Dogs and cats of any age can be affected by pyoderma.

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Pyometra

Pyometra is a severe bacterial infection of the uterus that can be potentially life threatening. The condition is most common in older, unspayed female dogs that have never had a litter, but it can occur in any female dog or cat that has not been spayed. In dogs, pyometra is most likely to happen in the first few weeks to months after a heat cycle.

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Radiography

A radiograph (sometimes called an x-ray) is a type of photograph that reveals the body’s bones and internal organs. The procedure for obtaining a radiograph is called radiography.  Radiography is a very useful diagnostic tool for veterinarians because it can help obtain information about almost any organ in the body, including the heart, lungs, and abdominal organs, as well as the bones.

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Rattlesnake Vaccine

Each year, about 150,000 dogs and cats are bit by venomous snakes in the United States. Most bites occur during warmer months (between April and October in the northern hemisphere). Snakebites are painful, and the injected venom can result in tissue swelling, impaired blood clotting, shock, and sometimes death. Treatment may include antivenin (a serum that neutralizes the venom), pain medications, IV fluids, and antibiotics to control secondary infections. Even if the pet recovers, there may be long-term complications.

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Refilling Medications

Many illnesses in pets can require long-term administration of medication, including some very common medical conditions.

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